Friday, May 04, 2007

The Afterlife Cheapens Both Life and Death

When shit like this happens, do assurances of eternal happiness in another dimension provide genuine comfort? Do promises of another, better existence pay proper respect to a tragedy such as this? Can a family grieve appropriately when this kind of disaster is watered down by predictions of infinite bliss via an oxymoronic "life after death"?

No.

Kill the afterlife. Spare the troops.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

Why can't we learn to live with each other here? I can't judge others but if I were a soldier in this dirty occupation at this point I'd rather be in the brig than in pieces. Please stop fighting and giving your precious lives, troops. If you think you have to prove something to yourselves or your family or your god, just stop and think of how f'ed up your loved one's lives will be when you are gone FOR GOOD. Even if you think you are going to a big invisible pinic in the sky, your baby and spouse will be left holding your broken body and all the bills. Ack! I HATE the greedy murderous bastard people who are ruining this beautiful nation:(

Sacred Slut said...

That sucks so much. My heart really breaks for that girl. My older brother died many years ago and I still miss him all the time.

An afterlife fantasy does make it somewhat easier to take, since you believe that you may be reunited at some future time. The fact that a fantasy makes it easier doesn't make it true, though. I'm not in favor of believing stuff just because it's a nicer story.

ecualegacy said...

I tried to leave my condolences at the bereaved's website, but couldn't find a way to post a comment. If you get the chance to pass this along, please offer my deepest condolences. I lost my mother last year. Living without those we love is a truly horrible thing to suffer. As a fellow soldier and human being, I grieve with those who must now go on without their loved ones.

I'll not be posting any comments about the comforts or insensitivities of belief in an afterlife here. The house of mourning is not the place for philosophy but for tears.

I am shedding tears for both Laura and myself even as I write.

-Brian